An Enslaved Community: Tracing Ancestors from 1867-68 Slave Statistics in P.G. County

This page is meant to be a resource for anyone who can trace an enslaved ancestor to one of three enslavers in the 1867-68 Slave Statistics for Prince George’s County, Maryland, namely Charles C. Hill, Richard Wootton, and Walter W.W. Bowie. All three intersect with the family of Francis Magruder Hall Sr. and Francis Magruder Hall Jr. Probate records for this branch of the Hall family are unusually detailed regarding the family relationships of the enslaved. My hope is that this family information can be matched to surnames provided in the Slave Statistics to help descendants trace their lineage beyond the barrier of slavery, and perhaps further. Sources on this page extend from 1868 back to the turn of the century. Some families and individuals can be tracked through multiple inheritances and transfers among Hall, Hill, Wootton, Weems, and Bowie family members. Last update 2 June 2021, additional detail re: the Weems-Bowie families & updated spreadsheet.

This is the first of two, possibly three, pages on related families. The rest of this project includes P.G. County and Washington DC enslavers named Hall, Magruder, McGregor, Bowie, Berry, Hamilton, and maybe Clark.

Please contact me if you have questions or info to contribute, or just to let me know this page helped you. It’s a rather overwhelming amount of information, and I’m happy to help you find your way through it. And, of course, if you see errors do let me know.

At the bottom of this page, you’ll find searchable lists of all names declared by Charles C. Hill (for himself, his children, or the estate of his late father), Richard Wootton, and Walter W.W. Bowie. Many thanks to Marie McGruder for helping to transcribe these lists.

Downloads

This page includes six downloadable files.

1) A spreadsheet of Hall Family Enslaved & Manumitted. This takes a looong time to download. And I’ll say right now: there are sure to be errors–it’s a lot of names!–so please check the document sources to confirm, and let me know if you find mistakes or get a read on names that are hard to decipher.

2) Notes on using the spreadsheet.

3) Family relationships among the enslaved community in the will of Francis M. Hall Sr (d1826).

4) A Hall Family Tree, to help you keep track of names & relationships in the wills

5) A transcription of the 1867-68 Slave Statistics for P.G. County. See the intro to this document, below. WWW Bowie is found on p 24, Charles C. Hill et.al. on pp 69, 70, & 77, & Richard Wootton on p 150.

6) An image of an 1860 deed transferring ownership of 16 people (provided b/c I can’t link directly to it). You will find this one embedded in the text, below. Back to the top

Intro to the Slave Statistics

In a law passed in 1867, the Maryland General Assembly complained that “under the Military of the United States, a large number of slaves owing service to loyal citizens of Maryland, were induced to leave their owners and enlist in the military service of the United States.” Hoping that the federal government would repay the state’s loyalty to the Union and compensate its citizens for the chattels lost, the General Assembly ordered that a record be made of all slave owners and those they had held in slavery as of November 1, 1864. Neither the federal government nor the state ever compensated the enslavers.

These records are far from complete. Declaration was voluntary, and was not open to citizens who could not demonstrate that they had remained loyal to the Union. Even so, these records—created in 1867 and 1868 and known as the Slave Statistics—are the most extensive and accessible evidence available of slaves and enslavers at the time of state emancipation. Lists of the enslaved include age (as of 1864), sex, physical condition and term of servitude for each individual. The schedules also indicate those who enlisted in the Union Army, and sometimes give the regiment in which the slave enlisted.

The Maryland State Archives (MSA) used to provide this downloadable transcription of the Prince George’s County Slave Statistics. It appears to have been removed from the site. All entries in the Slave Statistics are included in the online index of Prince George’s County Freedom Records, so if you are looking for a particular ancestor or enslaver you can find the name there. What the transcription offers, however, is a quickly accessible–and printable–list of every name declared by a single enslaver and others with the same surname.

Like many 19th c. records, this document groups surnames that begin with the same letter, but is not fully alphabetized–you won’t even find all entries of a given surname listed together. And, as usual, it is organized by name of the enslaver. Unfortunately, the PDF cuts off the columns for condition, term of enslavement, and military enlistment, but you will find names and ages. WWW Bowie is found on p 24, Charles C. Hill et.al. on pp 69, 70, & 77, & Richard Wootton on p 150. Back to the top

You should explore all the online resources at the MSA, including Flight to Freedom: Beneath the Underground Railroad, Legacy of Slavery in Maryland, and (once you have the name or names of enslavers) land ownership maps at the Library of Congress (here is P.G. County in 1861). These maps were commercial projects, and landowners had to subscribe to be included, but they will usually include at least the major landholders. The targeted Halls and Hills are in the southern portions of Queen Anne District; WWW Bowie is in the east-central part of the district, near Governor’s Bridge.

Tracking Families through Declarations by Charles C. Hill

If your ancestor was declared in 1868 by Charles C. Hill—for himself, his children, or the estate of his deceased father, Charles Hill Sr—there are several paths by which that ancestor or their family members might have wound up enslaved by the Hills. Charles C. Hill inherited enslaved people from his father, Charles Hill, Sr., who died in 1868. However, his will was written in 1859, with the expectation that his heirs would inherit the enslaved, and it includes names for a few individuals bequeathed to his children, and one “faithful servant” to be cared for in her old age. To two of his sons, Charles C, and Clement D. Hill, he leaves “all the servants and negroes” he had loaned them. The remainder of the enslaved were to be divided equally among his children. However, in an 1863 codicil he revoked all legacies to three sons (Eugene, Nicholas, and Augustine), settling all their portions on Charles C. In 1868 Charles C. Hill declared enslaved human property for himself, his children, and his father’s estate, which remained in probate because there were minor heirs for whose inheritance Charles C. was responsible.

Names Declared by Charles C. Hill

** Links for probate records take you to scans on FamilySearch.org, where you can read the original document. If you don’t have an account you’ll have to create one, but it’s free. **

Will of Charles Hill Sr. (written 1859, d.1868)

Charles Hill Sr. inherited enslaved people from each of his parents separately. Clement Hill wrote his will in 1806 and died in 1807. He bequeathed “a proportional share of my negroes” to each of his four children, William, Charles, John, Mary “Polly” Hall, and Susan. Mary had married Francis M. Hall Sr. (More on them, below.) Susan was unmarried in 1806, but later married the Honorable John G. Graham of Washington, DC. (I have not yet researched John or  William Hill or the Grahams.) Clement’s will is not very helpful, and the inventory is not online.

Will of Clement Hill (d.1807)

Inventory of Clement Hill is not online

Clement Hill’s widow, Eleanor Brent Hill (daughter of Eleanor Carroll and William Brent) lived until 1827, and she too bequeathed enslaved people to Charles and Mary, and presumably her other children. In her case, we have the reverse online—the inventory, but not the will. This gives us names, but no record of who inherited or purchased which people.

Will of Eleanor Hill (d.1827) is not online

Inventory of Eleanor Hill

Charles Hill Sr.’s last wife, Ann E. Snowden (daughter of Nicholas Snowden), was the widow of his nephew, Francis Magruder Hall Jr., son of Mary Hill Hall, so it is likely that some family lines among the enslaved converged when Ann & Charles married. Ann brought enslaved people to her first marriage, and then to her marriage with Charles Hill. Some were descended from those divided by the wills of Clement and Eleanor Hill. Because a woman’s legal existence merged with her husband’s upon marriage, anyone Mary inherited became the property of Francis M. Hall Sr. Thus her son, Francis Jr., inherited people whose families had come from the Hills. Francis Jr. died intestate at the age of 28, so there is no will.

Francis M. Hall Jr. (d.1832, intestate)

Francis M. Hall Jr. inventory

Francis M. Hall Jr’s father, Francis Magruder Hall Sr., died in 1826, just six years before his son, so there is good continuity between records for the enslaved in the two probate records. Even better, he left an extraordinarily helpful will, in which he named nearly all of the many people he enslaved. For most he provided at least one family relationship—spouse, child, or parent. He bequeathed people to his wife, Mary; to Francis M. Hall Jr.; to his daughter Margaret “Peggy” Hall Wootton; to his daughter Eleanor Hall Young (wife of Notley Young); to Eleanor’s son, Benjamin Young; and to a trust for the support of his younger son, Richard C. Hall. The trust was to be managed by Mary Hall and Francis Jr. (I don’t know why Richard couldn’t handle his own affairs; I do know that some people bequeathed to that trust were enumerated six years later in Francis Jr.’s estate.)

Because Francis Sr.’s will includes so many family relationships, we can see that for the most part he intended that families be kept together. In addition, a group of people he bequeathed to Eleanor Young had been purchased from her husband to begin with, during settlement of Notley’s brother’s estate, so they were returning to a community they had been parted from. It is worth considering that the families Francis left to Mary may be those that came to her from her parents, the Hills. The downloadable PDF (above) shows my reconstruction of family relationships, according to the will, color-coded to show who inherited each family or individual. When you read the will, you should check my interpretation of the family relationships. I have not found  the probate records of Notley or Eleanor Young.

Will of Francis M. Hall Sr. (d.1826)

Inventory of Francis M. Hall Sr.

Additional Inventory of Francis M. Hall Sr.

Manumissions by Francis M. Hall are found in the P.G. County Freedom Records.

In addition to his inheritance from his father, Francis M. Hall Jr. inherited enslaved people from his unmarried uncle, Richard Lowe Hall (d.1815). Others were left to another nephew, John Read Magruder III (s/o John Read Magruder Jr. + Amelia Hall), whose probate records I have not located. R.L. Hall’s will is not online but is summarized by Effie Gwynn Bowie.

Will of Richard Lowe Hall (d1815) is not online

Inventory of Richard Lowe Hall

Mary “Polly” Hill Hall, widow of Francis M. Hall Sr, lived until 1861. Her highly detailed will, written in 1853, does not tell us anything directly about those who were enslaved by her brother, Charles Hill, but does include names and family relationships, as does a codicil added in 1860. Also in 1860, she transferred ownership of sixteen people to her daughter, Margaret “Peggy” Wootton, by deed. (A downloadable copy of the deed follows. If you want to find it online, see directions in the sources list at the bottom of this page.) The will bequeathed a few individuals to three grandchildren. The remainder were to be divided between Peggy Hall Wootton and her daughter and a grown granddaughter, Eloise Smith, daughter of Eleanor Hall Young and Notley Young. Some of the enslaved were allotted by name to Peggy or to Eloise, but a subsequent clause allows Peggy Wootton to select different individuals, if she prefers. This is important, because most of those inherited by Elouise Smith were to be sold, with the proceeds held in trust for the benefit of Elouise and her children. Eloise’s husband (20 years her senior) was George Smith, of St. Mary’s County.

Will of Mary Hill Hall (written 1858, d.1861)

Inventory & sales of Mary Hall are not online. Sales could potentially show which people ultimately went to Peggy Wootton and which to the trust for Eloise Smith. Back to the top

Tracking Families through Declarations by Richard Wootton, via Hills & Halls

Margaret “Peggy” Hall married William Turner Wootton, a wealthy man from a political family, who served as Maryland’s Secretary of State 1845-48. He died in 1850, and that’s year’s census shows Peggy as a widow, living in P.G. County with her children. Also in the household was a 38 year-old mulatto man, William Percival. One of her sons, Francis Hall Wootton, held a government post in Utah Territory before the war. While serving as a volunteer (civilian) aide-de-camp to Confederate Generals Archer and A.P. Hill at Fredericksburg, he was shot the head and died on Christmas Eve, 1862. Another son, William T. Wootton, enlisted at Richmond as a private in a Confederate artillery unit, and died at the battle of Winchester in 1863. Her third son, Richard Wootton, registered for the (Union) draft in 1863. He is often styled “Colonel Wootton,” but so far I have found no record that he served in the war. In 1868, he declared a long list of people he had enslaved, including surnames that appear on other Hill-Hall family records.

Names Declared by Richard Wootton

To trace the pathways by which the enslaved descended through the Hall families to Richard Wootton, you should examine the records of his grandparents, Francis Magruder Hall Sr. and Mary Hill Hall; his uncle Francis Magruder Hall Jr.; Francis Sr.’s uncle, Richard Lowe Hall; and Mary Hill Hall’s parents, Clement and Eleanor Hill. All these links will be found in the preceding section, on Charles C. Hill. I have not had much luck tracking the Wootton family and their enslaved, but will add to this page if I find them.

In 1870, Richard Wootton was 35, unmarried, living in the Queen Anne District of Prince George’s County with his mother, Margart “Peggy” Wootton (70), and two black servants, Jacob and Ellen Hepburn, and a black farm hand, Joseph Thomas. Jacob, Ellen, and Joseph all are said to be 50 years old, a good hint that those ages are estimates. In the Slave Statistics, Jacob is said to have been 45 in 1868, Ellen 39, and Joe Thomas 50. Jacob is described as a carpenter. Back to the top

A Dr. William Turner Wootton, resident of Montgomery County, who enlisted in Frederick County, MD, as a contract surgeon in the Confederate army, and survived the war, was the son of Dr. John B. Wootton and Elizabeth Lynn Magruder (d/o Levin Magruder and Elizabeth Lynn). I have not researched his relationship with Peggy’s Hall’s husband. William Turner Wootton, and variations thereof, was a much-recycled name in the family.

Tracking Families through Declarations by Walter W. W. Bowie—the Weems/Hall Connection

Francis Magruder Hall Sr had two siblings, Richard Lowe Hall, covered above, and Mary Hall, who married James W. L. Weems. All the siblings inherited enslaved laborers from their father, Richard B. Hall, who wrote his will in 1802, died 1805. His land in Prince George’s County was left to Francis; his land in Montgomery County was left to Richard. The enslaved were divided among the three children and his widow, Margaret Magruder Hall (d/o James Magruder and Cave King). Names in this will are familiar from the probate records of Francis Hall and Richard Lowe Hall.

** Links for probate records take you to scans on FamilySearch.org, where you can read the original document. If you don’t have an account you’ll have to create one, but it’s free. **

Will of Richard B. Hall (written 1802, d.1805)

Inventory of Richard B. Hall is not indexed

James W. L. Weems wrote his will in 1808, d. 1811. He, too, bequeathed slaves by name to his heirs—his wife, Mary Hall Weems, and children Richard W. Weems, Margaret Hall Weems French, and Amelia Margaret Weems. His inventory is not online, but we learn the fate of two enslaved men in an 1814 record of Sales from the estate.

Will of James W.L. Weems (written 1808, d.1811)

Inventory of James W. L. Weems is not online

Sales from estate of James W.L. Weems (1814)

Richard W. Weems predeceased his father, dying in 1809, the year after the will was written. Margaret Hall Weems French gave birth to a daughter and then, like her brother, died in 1809. In 1827 two indentures were drawn up to divide the enslaved people enumerated in Richard W. L. Weems’ will. Excluding those inherited by his wife, the enslaved were allotted (by name) to a) the surviving daughter, Amelia M. Weems, by that time married to Walter Bowie Jr., and b) Margaret French, granddaughter of James and Mary Weems, by that time married to Robert Bowie (s/o Thomas Contee Bowie & Mary Mackall Bowie, daughter of a former governor of Maryland, Robert Bowie, and first cousin of Walter Bowie Jr).

A married woman having no legal existence separate from her husband, the legal heirs were Walter Bowie and Robert Bowie, respectively. However, within the indentures of 1827, each man sold the enslaved people back to Mary Hall Weems for a token $50, to be held in trust for their children. Each couple (Amelia & Walter, Margaret & Robert) were to have full use and benefit of the labor of the enslaved during their lives, but did not own them. In other words, the two Bowie families had control of the inherited slaves, but legal ownership resided with Mary, in trust for the children. Terms of the two indentures are nearly identical, but a special provision prohibited any of Margaret French’s inherited property coming under the control of her husband, Robert, or becoming surety for his debts. Mary Weems would later include the same terms in her will.

Read the indentures in Maryland Land Records online, Liber AB 4, pp 543, 544. See directions for this website in the Sources list, below.

Mary Hall Weems wrote her will in 1840, but lived until 1849, with the inventory completed the following year, so her probate records provide a good time bridge. The will names only a few people, including a special provision for the care of an enslaved woman, Lucy, who cared for Mary Weems in illness, emphasizing that she not be parted from her daughter, Harriet.

Will of Mary Hall Weems (written 1840, d.1849)

Inventory of Mary Hall Weems (1850)

Amelia Margaret Weems, wife of Walter Bowie Jr., inherited ten enslaved people by the will of her father, James W. L. Weems. In the 1827 division, made after the death of her siblings, she received an additional 15 people, in trust for her children. Her eldest son, Walter William Weems Bowie (known as “3 W’s”), married Adeline Snowden, sister of Ann Elizabeth Snowden, who married (first) Francis Magruder Hall Jr. and (second) Charles Hill. Walter Bowie Jr.’s will is not very helpful, as he names only three enslaved people, but his inventory is more informative. In 1868, the son, Walter W. W. Bowie, declared a long list of people he had enslaved.

Will of Walter Bowie Jr

Inventory of Walter Bowie Jr

Names Declared by Walter W. W. Bowie

Adeline and WWW Bowie had a son, Walter Bowie, who achieved fame in the Civil War as a Confederate captain of rangers in the 43rd Virginia Cavalry under General Mosby, using his local knowledge to lead raids on Union targets in Prince George’s and other Maryland counties. When cornered or imprisoned he twice escaped, but in 1864 he was killed near Sandy Spring, in Montgomery County. His brother, Henry Brune Bowie (called Brune) stayed with his dying brother and was captured.

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Manumissions & Bequests by Henry Lowe Hall, 1810-1817

The three children of Richard B. Hall—Francis Magruder Hall Sr, Richard Lowe Hall, and Mary Hall Weems—had a cousin, Henry Lowe Hall, who manumitted a dozen people in 1810, and approximately 25 more by will, at his death in 1817. A few named individuals were bequeathed to nieces and nephews in another branch of his family. In addition, he left real estate, other property, and money to Dolly Mullin, a free woman of color, and to her young son, Henry Mullin. Henry Lowe Hall never married, and may have fathered Henry Mullin and other children with Dolly. Though perhaps more distant, it is possible some of the people he manumitted were related to those who wound up under the control of Charles Hill Sr and his son, Charles C. Hill, by the time of emancipation in Maryland. All the documents linked here contain names of the enslaved and, in some cases, of free blacks.

** Links for probate records take you to scans on FamilySearch.org, where you can read the original document. If you don’t have an account you’ll have to create one, but it’s free. **

Henry Lowe Hall’s branch of the family–those descended from Benjamin Hall (d1803), a brother of Richard B. Hall–will be discussed in detail when I post later parts of this project. One of his sisters, Eleanor Hall, married twice, her second husband being John Smith Magruder, who changed his children’s names to McGregor. This part of the Magruder family also intermarried with branches of the Bowie, Burgess, Ewell, and Berry families.

Will of Henry Lowe Hall (d.1817)      

Inventory of Henry Lowe Hall includes only the few he did not manumit

Additional inventory of Henry Lowe Hall (1817)

Sales from estate of Henry Lowe Hall (1817)

Henry L. Hall manumissions are found in the P.G. County Freedom Records.

Henry Lowe Hall also bequeathed to Dolly Mullin “two young negroes, one called Joan, and the other Aaron.” However, the executors, two of Henry’s nephews, betrayed his wishes and sold all the property bequeathed to Dolly, including Joan and Aaron. Dolly Mullin was financially compensated, as required by law, but the story is heartbreaking, as those two young people were almost certainly her family members. Henry Lowe Hall also left land or money to other free people. Charles Tilghman, son of Peggy Tilghman, was bequeathed 100 acres, with a provision that he work the land for the benefit of Thomas Clarke, a Hall relative living on that land, until he (Charles) arrived at the age of 35, the land thereafter to be his. Peggy Tilghman had been previously manumitted by the family. A man named Jim, probably identical to a man named James whom Henry Lowe Hall had manumitted in 1810, was bequeathed $400.

And so, at last, I have arrived at the figure who launched this investigation of the Hall family and their relations. Henry Lowe Hall was the son of Benjamin Hall and Eleanor Murdock. His numerous siblings included William Murdock Hall, whose widow, Ann Duckett Hall, manumitted a large number of people in 1815 (some immediately, others after a term of service); Catherine Hall, who married John Burgess Bowie, a Magruder descendant and brother of William Mordecai Bowie; Ann Hall, who married Thomas Clark; and Eleanor Hall. Eleanor married (first) Dr. David Clark, brother of Thomas Clark, and (second) John Smith Magruder, who changed his children’s names to McGregor. My deep dive into this branch of the Halls (with more Bowie) will be online soon, as will an extensive update to information on the entire Magruder/McGregor-Bowie-Berry cluster and the enslaved community they controlled. Back to the top

Sources & Citations

Links for probate records take you to scans on FamilySearch.org, where you can read the original document. If you don’t have an account you’ll have to create one, but it’s free. Links for 1867-1868 “declarations” and for manumission records take you to specific images in the Maryland State Archives Index of Prince George’s County Freedom Records.

To read deeds and indentures online, you will need to create an account at the Maryland Land Records MDLandRecs page–it’s free. Once you’re in, choose Prince George’s County from the drop-down menu. In the “Jump to New Volume” box, enter the clerk’s initials, the volume number, and the page number (e.g. FS 1 10, or AB 4 543). Once you have accessed a volume via a single page, you can browse that volume by entering “from” and “to” page numbers in the box at lower right. You can download ten pages at a time–it takes a while, but does work. To change volumes, click “Jump to New Volume” in the topline menu.

Bowie, Effie Gwynn. Across the Years in Prince George’s County. Richmond VA: Garrett & Massie, 1947.

Emerson, Sue. Magruders in America. CD-ROM. Privately printed, 2007.

Hienton, Louise J. Index to the Freedom Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland, 1808-1869, S1411-08, Declarations by Walter W.W. Bowie; digital images #1895-1921, Maryland State Archives (https://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1411/000002/html/s141102-1895.html : accessed 18 May 2021).

Hienton, Louise J. Index to the Freedom Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland, 1808-1869, S1411-08, Manumissions by Francis M Hall; digital images #83-85, Maryland State Archives (https://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1411/000008/html/s141108-0083.html : accessed 12 Apr 2021).

Hienton, Louise J. Index to the Freedom Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland, 1808-1869, S1411-08, Manumissions by Henry Lowe Hall; digital images #96-126, Maryland State Archives (https://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1411/000008/html/s141108-0096.html : accessed 12 Apr 2021).

Hienton, Louise J. Index to the Freedom Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland, 1808-1869, S1411-08, Declarations by Charles C. Hill; digital images #1300-1562, Maryland State Archives https://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1411/000008/html/s141108-1300.html : accessed 12 May 2021).

Hienton, Louise J. Index to the Freedom Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland, 1808-1869, S1411-08, Declarations by Richard Wootton; digital images #1248-1293, Maryland State Archives (https://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1411/000023/html/s141123-1293.html : accessed 12 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County Court, Land Records, 1861-1864, MSA CE 64-8, Liber FS 1, p10, Deed from Mary Hall to Margaret Wootton; digital image, MDLandRec.net (https://mdlandrec.net/main/dsp_viewer.cfm?cid=PG&view=bookview&imtyp=current&di=y&srtyp=l&status=a accessed 12 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County Court, Land Records, 1825-1827, MSA CE 65-51, Liber AB 4, p543, Indenture between Mary Weems & Walter Bowie; digital image, MDLandRec.net (https://mdlandrec.net/main/dsp_viewer.cfm?cid=PG&view=bookview&imtyp=current&di=y&srtyp=l&status=a : accessed 26 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County Court, Land Records, 1825-1827, MSA CE 65-51, Liber AB 4, p544, Indenture between Mary Weems & Robert Bowie; digital image, MDLandRec.net (https://mdlandrec.net/main/dsp_viewer.cfm?cid=PG&view=bookview&imtyp=current&di=y&srtyp=l&status=a : accessed 26 May 2021).

Probate Records
I have read only the probate records available online. Others are included for your convenience.

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber PC, 1 p113, Will of Walter Bowie Jr (1839); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9T1L-KRY?i=68&wc=SNYC-927%3A146535401%2C147214001&cc=1803986 : accessed 18 May  2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber PC 3, p533, Inventory of Walter Bowie Jr (1839); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9TY2-9SYB?i=490&wc=SNY4-HZ7%3A146535401%2C147081301&cc=1803986 : accessed 18 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber TT 1, p411, Will of Francis Magruder Hall (1826); digital images, FamilySearch,.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1L-2F1?i=215&wc=SNYC-92W%3A146535401%2C147204001&cc=1803986 : accessed 5 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber TT 6, p340, Inventory, Francis M. Hall (1826); digital images FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1G-P85?i=181&wc=SNYC-3T5%3A146535401%2C147055001&cc=1803986 : accessed 6 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber TT 7, p99, Additional Inventory, Francis M. Hall (1826); digital images FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1G-R9N?i=50&wc=SNYC-7MS%3A146535401%2C147061101&cc=1803986 : accessed 7 May 2021)

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber PC 2, p84, Inventory of Francis M. Hall Jr (1832); digital imagesFamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GTY2-9SC7?i=61&wc=SNY4-HZ7%3A146535401%2C147081301&cc=1803986 : accessed 7 May 2021)

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber TT 1, p227, Will of Henry Lowe Hall (1817); digital images Family Search.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1L-2P1?i=111&wc=SNYC-92W%3A146535401%2C147204001&cc=1803986 : accessed 30 Apr 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber TT 2, p525, Inventory of Henry Lowe Hall (1817); digital images FamilySearch.org  (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9TY2-9S3K?i=286&wc=SNY4-HZW%3A146535401%2C147021801&cc=1803986 : accessed 30 Apr 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, WAJ 1, p198, Will of Mary Hill Hall, (1853/1860/1861); digital images FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GTY5-SDPS?i=132&wc=SNY4-6TP%3A146535401%2C147225101&cc=1803986 : accessed 3 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventories, Liber WAJ 2, p396, MSA CM809-31, Inventory of Mary Hill Hall (1861); Maryland State Archives microfilm CR 844-2.

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber 1, p609, Will of Richard B. Hall (1802/1805); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GTYR-WKG?i=312&wc=SNY4-FM3%3A146535401%2C147191001&cc=1803986 : accessed 11 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber TT 1, p130, MSA CM816-3, Will of Richard Lowe Hall (1815); Maryland State Archives microfilm CR 34682-1.

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber TT 2, p 20, Inventory of Richard Lowe Hall (1815); digital images, FamilySearch,org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9TY2-93MW?i=29&wc=SNY4-HZW%3A146535401%2C147021801&cc=1803986 : accessed 3 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber WAJ 1, p393, Will of Charles Hill (1859/1868); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GTY5-S6W4?i=236&wc=SNY4-6TP%3A146535401%2C147225101&cc=1803986 : accessed 8 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber T 1, p634, Will of Clement Hill (1807); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GTYR-4QQ?i=325&wc=SNY4-FM3%3A146535401%2C147191001&cc=1803986 : accessed 11 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventories, Liber TT 1, p238, CM809-15, Inventory of Clement Hill (1807); Maryland State Archives microfilm CR  34692-1.

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber TT 1, p419, MSA CM816-3, Will of Eleanor Hill (1827); Maryland State Archives microfilm CR 34682-1.

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber TT 7, p65, Inventory of Eleanor Hill (1827); digital images FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1G-RMY?i=33&wc=SNYC-7MS%3A146535401%2C147061101&cc=1803986 : accessed 11 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber TT 1, p50, Will of James Lock Weems (1811); digital images FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1L-21X?i=30&wc=SNYC-92W%3A146535401%2C147204001&cc=1803986 : accessed 13 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventories, Liber TT 1, p436, CM809-15, Inventory of Janes W. L. Weems (1811); Maryland State Archives microfilm CR 34692-1.

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Sales, TT 3, p17, Sales of James William L. Weems; digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9TBP-DT?i=9&wc=SNYH-DP6%3A146535401%2C147037001&cc=1803986 : accessed 13 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Wills, Liber PC 1, p384, Will of Mary Hall Weems (1839/1849); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GT1L-2LZ?i=208&wc=SNYC-927%3A146535401%2C147214001&cc=1803986 : accessed 13 May 2021).

Maryland, Prince George’s County, Register of Wills, Inventory Accounts, Liber JH 2, p122, Inventory of Mary Hall Weems (1850); digital images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GTBP-SBN?i=81&wc=SNYH-DPD%3A146535401%2C147115201&cc=1803986 : accessed 14 May 2021).

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Names Declared by Charles C. Hill, for himself, his children,
& the estate of his deceased father, Charles Hill

Ages as of 1864

Declared by Charles C. Hill for himself

Jack Brogden, 70 years old
Robert Fletcher, 60 years old
Henry Digges, 50 years old
Sally Digges, house servant, 45 years old
Maria Brown, house servant, 34 years old
Nace Mitchell, 44 years old
Lucy Mitchell, 46 years old
Issac Mitchell, 27 years old
Henrietta Fletcher, 22 years old
Martha Ann Mitchell, 15 years old
Moses Richardson, 44 years old
Theresa Richardson, 35 years old
Louisa Richardson, 17 years old
Jane Richardson, 15 years old
John Fletcher, 33 years old
Mary Digges, 70 years old
Hannah Robinson, 44 years old
James Digges, 40 years old
Mary Hawkins, 22 years old
Dennis Robinson, 20 years old
Ann Robinson, 15 years old
Kitty Carroll, 49 years old
Samuel Guy (or Grey), 24 years old
Nancy Johnson, 22 years old
Robert Guy (or Grey), 21 years old
Jane Digges, 19 years old
Flora Williams, 17 years old
Henry Tyler, 15 years old
Thomas Shorter, 35 years old
Jerry Shorter, 27 years old
Abby Stewart, 49 years old
Sophy Tilghman, 30 years old
Harriet Fletcher, 28 years old
Marian Shorter, house servant, 36 years old
William Henry Barnes, a carpenter, 29 years old
Josephine Guy [or Grey], 15 years old
Georgiana Jones, house servant, 17 years old
Sophia Tilghman, 14 years old
Cecilia Brown, 43 years old
Rachel Hawkins, 19 years old
William Brown, 17 years old
Maria Brown, 15 years old
Betty Barnes, 29 years old
Francis Lyles, 31 years old
Ann Brown, 43 years old
Ellen Brown, 19 years old
Mary Brown, 17 years old
Laura Virginia Robinson, 13 years old
Elizabeth Richardson, 13 years old
Sarah Jane Brown, 12 years old
James Tilghman, 33 years old
Betsy Fletcher, 30 years old
Mary Brown, 10 years old
James W. Robinson, 10 years old
Chas. Thos. Shorter, 10 years old
William Tilghman, 9 years old
Francis Barnes, 9 years old
Susan Martha Fletcher, 9 years old
Henry Nathan Mitchell, 9 years old
Benedict Brown, 9 years old
Jno. Thos. Richardson, 9 years old
Archiebald Shorter, 20 years old
Milly Robinson, 19 years old
Richard Shorter, 15 years old
Joshua Brown, a carpenter, 50 years old
Cecilia Tyler, 8 years old
Warren Fletcher, 33 years old
Michael Fletcher, 7 years old
Chas. Hawkins, 20 years old
Saml. Hawkins, 23 years old
Emily Warren, 27 years old
Ann Maria —, 9 years old
Margaret Fletcher, 6 years old
Washington Richardson, 6 years old
Margaret Robinson, 6 years old
Richard Hawkins, 5 years old
Harriet Crawford, 37 years old
John Crawford, 17 years old
Thomas Crawford, 15 years old
Lucy Crawford, 12 years old
Ellen Campbell, 23 years old
Catherine Brown, 5 years old
Robert Fletcher, 5 years old
Eloisa Tilghman, 5 years old
William Warren, 5 years old
Ann Maria Richardson, 4 years old
Mary Elizabeth Fletcher, 4 years old
Edward Robinson, 4 years old
William Henry Hawkins, 4 years old
Elizabeth Fletcher, 4 years old
Caroline Fletcher, 4 years old

James Washington Crawford, 3 years old
Kitty Ann Johnson, 3 years old
Abraham Brown, 3 years old
Caroline Williams, 3 years old
James Thomas Brown, 2 years old
Alice Hawkins, 2 years old
Jno. Francis Tilghman, 2 ½ years old
Henrietta Campbell, 2 ½ years old
Ann Fletcher, 2 ½ years old
Sarah Ann Richardson, 2 ½ years old
Elizabeth Fletcher, 2 ½ years old
Eliza C. Johnson, 2 ½ years old
Wm. Douglas Shorter, 1 ½ years old
William Digges, 1 ½ years old
Edward Crawford, 1 ½ years old
Cornelia Fletcher, 6 mos old
Edward Warren, 6 mos old
Alfred Johnson, 6 mos old
Louis Williams, 6 mos old
Robert Fletcher, a carpenter, 38 years old
Hope Shorter, 60 years old

Declared by Charles C. Hill acting on behalf of his son, Chas. Hill

Beck Chew, 30 years old
Richard Chew, 12 years old
Sarah Ann Chew, 9 years old
John Thomas Chew, 3 years old

Declared by Charles C. Hill acting on behalf of his daughter, Miss Mary Ida Hill

Mary Ann Tilghman, 28 years old
Richard Tilghman, 3 years old
Edward Tilghman, 1 ½ years old

Declared by Charles C. Hill as executor for estate of his father, Charles Hill

William Campbell, 30 years old
Thomas Campbell, 28 years old
Nace Campbell, 26 years old
Milly Campbell, 35 years old
Betty Campbell, 32 years old
Walter Campbell, 18 years old
Ellen Campbell, 16 years old
Rachel Campbell, 13 years old
Nace Campbell Jr., 8 years old
Jennie Fletcher, 34 years old
John Fletcher, 15 years old
Basil Fletcher, 17 years old
Jim Fletcher, 9 years old
Margaret Fletcher, 7 years old
Ben Fletcher Jr., 2 years old
Nancy Digges, 55 years old
Kitty Digges, 17 years old
Dennis Digges, 25 years old
Henry Digges, 19 years old
Sarah Digges, 10 years old
Betsy Jones, 18 years old
Kitty Jones, 16 years old
Dick —, 20 years old
Amelia Jones, 10 years old
Billy Jones, 5 years old
Ben Fletcher, 23 years old
Moses Harford, 65 years old
Sally Harford, 50 years old
Jack Wilson, 70 years old
Betsy Wilson, 65 years old
Matthew Wilson, 40 years old
Michael Digges, 55 years old
Kate Digges, 48 years old
Mary Digges, 30 years old
Maria —, 28 years old
child of Mary [Digges], 10 years old
child of Mary [Digges], 8 years old
child of Mary [Digges], 6 years old
Bill Chew, 35 years old
Michael Chew, 30 years old
Tom Fletcher, 32 years old
Nace Fletcher, 30 years old
Ellen —, 26 years old
Michael Fletcher, 57 years old
wife of Michael [Fletcher], 50 years old
Charles Digges, 23 years old
Gabriel Digges, 25 years old
Becky Fletcher, 18 years old
Letty Fletcher, 16 years old

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Names Declared by Richard Wootton

Ages as of 1864

Betsy Gantt, 38 years old
Jerry Gantt, 21 years old
Harriet Gantt, 18 years old
Andrew Gantt, 16 years old
Rachel Gantt, 14 years old
Peter Gantt, 13 years old
Sophy Semmes, 18 years old
Rose Semmes, 17 years old
Sally Semmes, 13 years old
Robert Semmes, 9 years old
Willie Semmes, 6 years old
Semmes, infant of Sophy, 1 year old
Jacob Hepburn, a carpenter, 45 years old
Ellen Hepburn, 39 years old
JIm Hepburn, 20 years old
Nancy Hepburn, 17 years old
John Hepburn, 11 years old
Kitty Brown, 42 years old
Bill Brown, 22 years old
Mary Brown, 20 years old
Brown, infant of Mary 1 1/2 years old
Isaac Brown, 16 years old
Henry Brown, 13 years old
Alfred Brown, 7 years old

Nelly Brent, 45 years old
Jim Williams, 17 years old
Joe Thomas, 50 years old
James Harris, 50 years old
Richard Tilghman, 26 years old
Eliza Tilghman, 24 years old
Tilghman, Charlotte, 20 years old
Maria Parker, 20 years old
Nancy Parker, 3 years old
Charles Parker, 1 1/2 years old
Thomas Sprigg, 27 years old
Charlie Irons, 22 years old
Eliza Wood, 20 years old
Maria Wood, 18 years old
Wood, infant of Maria, 1 1/2 years old
Lizzie Toodles, 20 years old
Becky Ann Harrison, 19 years old
Louis Wood, 17 years old
Moses Wood, 15 years old
Adeline Wood, 13 years old
Martha Sprigg, 21 years old
Adam Plummer, 16 years old

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Names Declared by Walter W.W. Bowie

Ages as of 1864

Aaron Digges, a carpenter, 70 years old
Charity Bowie, 65 years old
Rachel Topham, 30 years old
Polly Topham, 14 years old
Jim Topham, 6 years old
Sam Topham, 4 years old
Henrietta Topham, 6 mos old
Nancy Harrison, 65 years old
Wat Harrison, a carpenter, 49 years old
Eliza Tyler, 40 years old
Jim Tyler, 20 years old
Mark Tyler, 16 years old
Luke Tyler, 10 years old
Dick Tyler, 4 years old
Nelly Tyler, 1 year old

Sarah Ann Harrison, 25 years old
Arthur Harrison, 1 year old
Moses Sprigg, 40 years old
Aaron Digges Jr., 20 years old
Chas. Harrison, 24 years old
Ned Weldon, 30 years old
Ann Weldon, 28 years old
Louisa Snowden, 24 years old
Charles Weldon, 10 years old
John Weldon, 4 years old
Bill Harrison, 20 years old
Lizzie Snowden, 6 years old

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